Just one improperly recycled refrigerator produces as much pollution as a car driven 17,000 km in one year!

If not treated, refrigeration and air conditioning appliances contribute to depletion of the ozone layer, global warming, increased health risks, rising sea level, changes to wildlife habitat and extreme weather conditions.

Definition of halocarbons

Halocarbons are manmade products that contain fluorine, carbon and hydrogen, and may also contain chlorine. These include chlorofluorocarbons (CFC), hydro chlorofluorocarbons (HCFC) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC). Freon is the commercial name of a refrigerant gas that contains halocarbons used on air conditioning, refrigeration and dehumidification.

Environmental impact of CFCs, Freon and other ODS

Ozone-depleting substances (ODS) are halocarbons that contain chlorine. This chlorine reacts with and destroys the ozone concentrated in a layer 10 to 40 km above the earth, in the stratosphere. This layer protects us from ultraviolet radiation and its harmful effects. The greenhouse effect and depletion of the ozone layer contribute to global warming. That increases demand for air conditioning and energy, so more refrigeration and air conditioning appliances are produced, triggering a vicious cycle.

More than 85% of the gas in coolant coils and insulating foam in Quebec continues to be released into the atmosphere.

The only way to counter these pollution problems linked to old refrigerators and cooling equipment is to join the FreezPonsible® program.

Regulation of halocarbons

Although there are regulations governing halocarbons, compliance is lacking. In fact, more than 85% of the gas in cooling coils and insulating foam in Quebec continues to be released into the atmosphere.

Q-2, r. 29 – Regulation respecting halocarbons
Federal Halocarbons Regulations (2003) (DORS/2003-289)
• Ozone-depleting Substances Regulations (1998) (DORS/99-7)

Ask your municipality to participate in our FreezPonsible® program.